Easily Confused Words: Rumi vs. Roomy

Rumi and roomy are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Rumi (pronounced “roo-mee”) is a proper noun. It means Mawlana Jalaluddin Mohammad Balkhi, a 13th century Persian poet. In the West, he is simply referred to as Rumi. He is as famous as England’s Shakespeare.

Check out this UK website about him here. Check out dramatic readings of 15 of his works, translated in English, here.

NOTE: Persia has been called Iran since 1935. Persia‘s history dates back to the 6th century BC, and its geographic location is one of the oldest inhabited places in the world.

As a proper noun, the first letter should always be capitalized when written. This applies to the names of people, events, or places.

Roomy (pronounced “roo-mee”) is an adjective. It is used to describe spaciousness of an interior. If a person uses it to describe a space, usually that room is not spacious at all, like a tiny affordable apartment in a city.

The following story uses both words correctly:

He discovered the book of Rumi’s poetry in his new roomy apartment. It had slipped under the radiator by the window. The last tenant had likely made a hasty exit on the 31st and forgotten it.

Once the futon, a floor lamp, and five boxes were brought upstairs, he was technically moved in. It was a good thing he didn’t own a lot of furniture, because there wasn’t space for it in this 700 square feet space. But it was all he could afford fresh out of school, and it was convenient to his new job. He opened a soda, opened the book, and took a break. The first line read:

“A little while alone in your room will prove more valuable than anything else that could ever be given you.”

Well, that was oddly appropriate.

Easily Confused Words: Grafting vs. Grifting

Grafting and grifting are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Grafting (pronounced “GRaFF-tihng;” rhymes with crafting) is the gerund form of the verb “graft.” To graft is to take a piece of one living thing and patch it into another.

For example:

  • In agriculture, apple trees are grafted when a branch of one is attached to another’ apple trees limbs. As the two grow together, the intent is to create a fruit that has desirable consistent characteristics, for example, the fruit will be more resistant to disease than either parent tree was on its own. Read more about grafting here.

Human skin can also be grafted.

  • In dentistry, perhaps a patient has a problem with thinning gums that will ultimately lead to tooth loss. A dental surgeon cuts skin from the roof of the mouth where skin is thick, and sews that portion onto the thinning gum area. Eventually all the skin grows together and any stitches disappear. The area where the skin was removed eventually heals over.
  • Skin grafting can also be done when a person is badly burned in a fire and needs skin from another part of their body to grow new skin where the burn happened, or if they are a victim of a skin eating bacteria where there’s an open hole in their skin that must be patched. Click here to learn more.

Grifting (pronounced “grihft-ihng;” rhymes with gifting, drifting, lifting) is the gerund form of the verb grift. To grift is to take money via fraud or scheming rather than honest work.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Graziella was grafting trees in the family orchard when she got a call her brother Grainger was arrested for grifting money from public coffers and would need $6000 for bail.

“Guess we can’t go on a vacation now, Steve, Grainger’s in trouble.

“Who says we have to bail him out? I knew something was up. He kept buying nice stuff his public salary wouldn’t allow. Let him rot.”

“But he’s family, Steve.”

“He never learns anything because he has you as an escape clause, Grazie. We have to stop enabling him. Let him sit in jail and think about how to make an honest living. He’s shamed the family with his behavior.”

Graziella felt a migraine coming on as she realized her husband had a point.

Easily Confused Words: Faye vs. Fade

Faye and fade are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Faye (pronounced “fff-A;” rhymes with ray, bay, clay, say) is a female first name. It is a name on its own, or it can be short for Faith, the word for belief. Belief can be in a being, in oneself or others, or an expression of hope that things will get better.

Fade (pronounced “ff-Aid;” rhymes with glade, made, bade) has multiple meanings.

  • As a verb, it refers to a light source decreasing growing weaker or being dimmed on purpose.
  • In films, it can refer to an effect where the onscreen image’s lighting and clarity gradually gets darker and disappears. Perhaps the story was being told through a character’s eyes, but they were killed, they passed out, etc. and the movie is showing you firsthand what that looked like.
  • In haircutting, it refers to an effect created in men’s hair with an electric razor. Hair remains thick on top of the head, but as the hair descends to the neck and ears, it is trimmed close and it appears to “disappear” into the skin. The hair goes from 100% it fades to 70% then 50% then 20% then 5% then nothing. Check out a video here. Hair guards that go on the razor are numbered 1-10; the higher the number the longer the hair remains, the lower the number the shorter the hair is cut. #1 completely buzzes the hair off. When cutting hair it’s important to take off the minimum amount of hair because one’s its removed it can’t be put back on it has to be given time to grow back.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Faye had been going to school and working in retail when the economy took a serious hit. At first she was devastated, it really hurt that she had to completely alter her life plans. But then she realized she had some tricks up her sleeve. She had cut her own hair for years.

She put a sign and a chair in her front yard. For $10, she cut hair for neighbors in her front yard. Trims, fades, layered cuts, she was doing it all.

Easily Confused Words: Gest vs. Jest

Gest and jest are easily confused words. They are also homophones, words that sound the same but are spelled differently and mean different things. [Homophones are a type of homonym, click the link to learn more.]

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Gest (pronounced “jest”) is a noun. It means:

  • a story, fable, or tale
  • a quest or adventure

Jest (pronounced “jest”) is a noun. It means a joke, something said as kidding, or a prank.

The following story uses both words correctly:

“Dad we’re running out of time. Can you stop goofing around and tell me something important?!”

Jessica was frustrated with her father, Jessie, as he approached the final months of his life. He had fought cancer for years, but now it was gaining on him and he had become resigned to that fact that his time was almost up.

When she visited, she was trying to make the most of the time. She asked for gests, epic tales of his life that she could record on her phone, writing them down later for her kids to enjoy when they were older. But Jessie wasn’t cooperating, he just wanted to share jests and tease his nurses.

The following story uses both words correctly: Easily Confused Words: Guest vs. Guessed

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED JULY 9, 2020, AT 3:00 P.M.

Easily Confused Words: Redundant vs. Repugnant

Redundant and Repugnant are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Redundant (pronounced “ree-duhn-dant”) is an adjective. It describes something repetitive or acting as backup, or replacement, to something else.

  • In language, redundant isn’t a good thing. It indicates word choice that is saying the same things over and over. This is not in a way that’s reiterating a theme or helping driving home a point, it’s poorly constructed writing. (This is different than a sermon or political speech returning to a phrase in between stories or examples.)
  • In business, when companies take over other ones, they often eliminate redundant jobs in the acquired company.
  • In IT, redundant is a good thing, it means when one thing fails, something else is already set up to do the job in its place.
  • In electrical power, redundant is a good thing. Should the power fail, a generator can be used to do the job until the power grid returns to full functionality.

Repugnant (pronounced “ree-puhg-nuhnt”) is an adjective. It describes describes something disgusting, detestable, or gross. This can be something literal, like raw sewage or garbage, or something more figurative, like amoral or unethical behavior, i.e., corruption or nepotism in government.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Redmilla ran a tight ship. Every week she looked at her operations, looking for any redundancy she could eliminate in costs. She always wanted to make things run more efficiently and maximize profitability; she found waste and redundancy to be repugnant.

Easily Confused Words: Cutesy vs. Courtesy

Cutesy and courtesy are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Cutesy (pronounced “kyoot-see”) is an adjective. It means something making a forced or concentrated effort to come across small, adorable, precocious, or a combination of these. A more modern word related to this idea is “twee.”

Courtesy (pronounced “kurt-uh-see”) is a noun.

  • It means a gesture done with consideration, showing good manners and respect.
  • In the phrase “courtesy of,” usually means something was donated or loaned by a business for a special event

The following story uses both words correctly:

Courtney suffered no fools. When new hires came in, they would make jokes or be silly during training. She wasn’t amused. She admonished them, “Please give the company the courtesy of taking your job seriously. Don’t be cutesy. Goofing around implies you don’t care, and if you don’t care, you should apply somewhere else where you do care.”

Easily Confused Words: Jib vs. Glib

Jib and Glib are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Jib (“jihb”; rhymes with nib, fib, bib) is a noun.

  • It is the large triangular sail on the front of the mast of modern (late 20th century-present) sailboats.
    • Having two sails on one mast enables more surface area to capture wind, this propels the boat through the water faster.
    • It helps assists the main sail to help the boat maintain balance in often rapidly fluctuating winds.

On older style boats, like schooners and galleons, there are multiple jibs, sails, and masts.

Glib (pronounced “glihb”) is an adjective. It describes something done or said is a careless, indifferent manner.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Gilbert suspected he would need to find a new crew for his sailing expedition. Hiring his friends had not been a good idea as he’d hoped. The gib and other sails weren’t rigged properly, and when he asked how things were going, he got glib responses. They just weren’t as into it as he was. So he stopped by boat supply stores and started asking around for references of people really engaged in sailing.

Easily Confused Words: Enact vs. Inactive

Enact and inactive are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Enact (pronounced “ihn-act;” rhymes with react, ) is a verb. It means to put a law or rule into effect.

Inactive (pronounced “ihn-actihv”) is an adjective. It describes someone or something that is not in service, or not participating in physical activity.

The following story both words correctly:

Mayor Ingmar Nass had been alerted in the last two years that as his town, Ennisville, had shifted to a white collar economy, its people were wealthier, but becoming more inactive. Morbid obesity and stress were on the rise. Several children had been orphaned by parents suddenly dying in midlife rather than mature age. This was a disturbing trend, and Nass felt compelled to do something to stop this trend in its tracks.

He enacted a Get Moving policy for the community. It encouraged people to bike to work and for errands. Every business got a bicycle parking shelter installed out front. And he commissioned more trails to be built in green spaces around the city.

Easily Confused Words: Ate vs. Eight

Ate and eight are easily confused words. They are also homophones, which are words that sound the same, but are spelled differently and mean different things. [Homophones are a type of homonym, click the link to learn more.]

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Ate (pronounced “ate;” rhymes with late, Kate, Tate, Nate, mate, rate) is the past tense of the verb “eat.” To eat is to consume food, by putting it in your mouth, chewing, then swallowing. So “ate” indicates a person or creature did some eating in the past. Used with other verbs, “ate” indicates repeated eating in the past.

Eight (pronounced “ate;” rhymes with weight, freight) is a noun. It is the word for the number “8.”

The following story uses both words correctly:

After his shift at the hospital, Akihito ate a bowl of before collapsing into bed at 8 A.M.

Easily Confused Words: Cordon vs. Condone

Cordon and condone are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway.

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It suggests what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions couldn’t be more off base and produces humorous results.

Cordon (pronounced “KOHR-duhn”) is a verb. It means a line of guards or structures to prevent common access to an area. It can mean rope or partition property off to prevent entry. For example, a crime scene is cordoned off to prevent any intrusion or tampering with the evidence.

[This is not to be confused with a French word, “cordon,” (kohr-DAWn) which just means a cord.]

Condone (pronounced “kuhn-DOHnn”) is a verb. It means to approve of someone else’s actions.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Cordelia didn’t condone her son Cory’s efforts to cordon off his room and his Legos from his baby brother, Christopher.