An Edit Button on Twitter

A lot of people want an edit button on Twitter.

But it’s not like there’s a timer on the “post” field in Twitter. It’s not like a user only gets 30-60 seconds to respond with 280 characters or less.

Users have time to proofread, they just aren’t doing it.

Users have time to consult an online dictionary in another window, or just a Google search in another window will often help. Again, users just aren’t doing it.

The point of Twitter, I thought, was to capture statements and thoughts “in the moment.” They can’t be reworded, so I hope it never gets an edit button.

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Easily Confused Words: Spouse vs. Espouse

Spouse and espouse are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway.

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Spouse (pronounced “spow-ss”; rhymes with mouse, louse) is a noun. It’s a gender-neutral word for a person’s marriage partner.

Espouse (pronounced “eh-spowzz”; rhymes with cows) is a verb. It means to recommend or suggest a technique, method, or remedy to others so they can resolve a problem.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Dr. Serapia was a popular podcaster and noted lecturer on psychology and relationships. She espoused the importance of making time and provided undivided attention on the most valued people in her listener’s lives. Making a lot of money to lavish those people with gifts wasn’t the key to a great relationship, she said. And she added anecdotes from her personal life. After a long successful career in corporate real estate, but two unhappy spouses that ultimately filed for divorce. This devastating experience led her to study psychology and opened up a new focus for her life. 

Easily Confused Words: Lesions vs. Legions

Lesions and legions are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway.

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Lesions (pronounced “lee-zyuns”) is a plural noun. It means more than one area of broken skin or tissue. For example, a cut, burn, bite, or other infection. Lesions can also occur on the inside of the body.

Legions (pronounced “lee-jyuns”; rhymes with regions) is a plural noun.

  • It describes multiple units of soldiers.
  • It can also be used more generally to indicate a high volume of people or things, for example, pop stars often have legions of fans.
  • A related proper noun, The American Legion, is one of the oldest veterans service organizations in the country.
  • The singular “legion” can describe a massive number of people or things.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Celestia and Lucrecia, twin sisters, were reading about the Great War in the newspaper. They felt compelled to become nurses for the Red Cross, to help the legions of soldiers fighting for Britain and France. In the field they regularly treated lesions, assisted in amputations, and tried to comfort soldiers who had experienced shell shock from explosions. 

Easily Confused Words: Adopt vs. Adapt

Adopt and adapt are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway.

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Adopt (pronounced “uh-dawpt”; rhymes with opt, lopped) is a verb.

  • It can mean to become the legal guardian of a child. It can also apply to domestic animals at shelters.
  • It can mean to create and start following a new rule, law, or procedure. For example: my homeowners association (HOA) recently adopted a new set of by-laws.

Adapt (pronounced “uh-dapt”; rhymes with apt, mapped, lapped, capped) is a verb. It means to adjust one’s approach to work in changing circumstances. Absent team members, cancelled appointments, a economic downturn, bad weather are all examples of things that might require someone to adapt when they accomplish a task, and how they accomplish a task.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Adaline wanted to adopt a Siamese kitten, but she noticed she didn’t have the funds at the moment. She estimated she would have to give up her morning deluxe coffee beverages and some mani-pedi appointments for several months in order to save up the money. 

 This post relates to another post: Easily Confused Words: Adapt vs. Adept.

Easily Confused Words: Angina vs. Anhinga

Angina and anhinga are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway.

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Angina (pronounced “ann-jeye-nuh”) is a noun. It’s a medical word. It’s a term for when a person feels a choking or suffocating sensation, which is related to tightness and painful muscle spasms.

Angina pectoris specifically means tightness in your heart and chest area that’s caused by clogged arteries, aka, arteriosclerosis.

Anhinga (pronounced “an-hihng-uh”) is a noun. It means a brownish black shorebird with a long neck found in marshes and swamps. Anhingas swim and dive underwater for fish. They stand on the shoreline or perch in trees, holding their wings aloft for air drying. Here’s a video by FrontYardVideo. 9At the end of it, you can see an anhinga, which has a straight, spearlike beak, next to its bird cousin, the cormorant, which has a slightly downturned tip to its beak.)

The following story uses both words correctly:

It was a beautiful day to walk through the Swampwalk park with Grandma. Anahita had looked forward to it all week. She thought she might want to work with wildlife when she grew up.

While they were gazing at egrets and anhingas, Grandma stopped walking. “I need to sit down, Anahita, I don’t feel so good.” She put her hand to her chest. “Just give me a minute, dear, and then we can get back to seeing the animals.”

Anahita suddenly didn’t care so much about the animals. She was scared about her grandma’s condition. She remembered something she just recently learned in school. “Grandma, can I borrow your phone? I think we might need to call for help.” She looked around and saw a park ranger and waved furiously at him. He saw her out of the corner of his eye and walked over.

“How are you doing? I’m Andy. Can I help with something?”

Anahita blurted, “My grandma’s chest hurts and she can’t breathe good. Can you get help?”

“Oh no, that could angina or something else. Yes, I will call the main office to get a team out here as soon as we can.” He pulled out his radio. “Yes this is Andy at Station 5, we need some medical assistance for a guest out here. We don’t think she can walk back to the station.”

“You said Station 5? What is the name of the guest?”

“What are your names?”

“I’m Anahita and this is my grandma, Anara Sadeghi.”

“Yes, it’s Anita—

“Anahita.”

Andy paused and started again. “Sorry, it’s Ana-hita and Anara Sadeghi. It’s a young lady and her Grandmother at Station 5.”

The voice in his walkie-talkie responded,”We’ll get EMS out there right away.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Easily Confused Words: Filing vs. Filling

Filing and filling are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway.

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Filing (pronounced “feye-lihng”; rhymes with wiling) has multiple meanings.

  • As the gerund form of the verb “file:”
    • it can mean putting papers in their proper folder for organization.
    • it can also mean submitting papers to a central authority, like the IRS, as a record of taxes paid on a yearly basis.
    • As a noun, filing can mean the papers being filed with the central authority.
  • As the gerund form of the verb “file,” it can mean to use a tool with rough sides to sand down one’s fingernails, toenails, or rough calloused skin. Other heavy duty files are used in sculpture and woodworking to smooth edges and help pieces fit together more effectively.

Filling (pronounced “fihl-ihng”; rhymes with willing, milling, tilling) has multiple meanings.

  • As a noun, in dentistry, it can mean the metal or other material used to fill teeth that have cavities.
  • As a noun, in baking, it can mean the flavored paste or gel used in jelly doughnuts, or between the inner layers of a pastry or cake.
  • As a verb, it means to taking on a job or a task, or hiring someone for a job or task.
  • In the phrase “filling in,” someone is working at a job in someone else’s absence.
  • In the phrase “filling out,” someone is completing the blanks or fields on a form.
  • In the phrase “filling up,” someone is putting gas (petrol) in their tank or oil canister.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Felipe had waited until the last minute for filing his taxes by April 15th. Unfortunately, calculating those figures was proving very hard to do when his mouth hurt this bad. He likely had a cavity and needed a filling. 

Easily Confused Words: Bundt vs. Bunt

Bundt and bunt are easily confused words. They are also homophones, meaning they sound the same, but are spelled differently and mean different things.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway.

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Bundt (“buhnt”) is a proper noun. It means a ring-shaped cake with fluted edges, or the pan used to bake such a cake. The pan was created by Nordic Ware in the US in the 1950s. Similar pans are called fluted or tube pans.

Bunt (“buhnt”) is a verb. In baseball, it means to tap the ball with the bat.

The following story uses both words correctly:

The kids were playing a vigorous game of baseball during the family picnic. Bhumi bunted the ball instead of hitting it hard. She didn’t want to hit Auntie Bonny, who was carefully  carrying her classic Bundt cake to the desserts table and didn’t notice all the activity out in the yard.