Easily Confused Words: Contest vs. Context

Contest and context are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Contest (pronounced “kawn-tehst”) has multiple meanings.

  • As a noun, it can mean a competition, lottery, etc.
  • As a verb, it means to challenge the results of a competition, like an election, sports event, etc.

Context (pronounced “kawn-tehckst”) is a noun. It means the conditions that set the scene in a sentence, in a story, or other scenarios.

The following story uses both words correctly:

At Clovis High, there was a great deal of controversy when the results of class rank were contested. This was the first time in the history of the school this happened. Some parents demanded that the GPAs be recalculated and weighted in context to the difficulty of the classes. In the end there was a compromise where the class had 2 valedictorians and 2 salutatorians.

Easily Confused Words: Lori vs. Lorry

Lori and lorry are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Lori (pronounced “lohr-ee”) means “bay tree.” It is related to “Laurie,” “Lauren,” “Laurel.” All names are somewhat related to Daphne, the nymph who begged to be turned into a laurel tree rather than be in a relationship with Apollo.

Lorry (pronounced “lohr-ee”) is a British English word for a truck.

The following story uses both words correctly:

It was completely surprising for Mark to come home and find out Lori hadn’t been home. She had lived there five years with him. Most days, she came across reasonably happy and wanting for nothing.

He had thought nothing was unusual the night before. The note she had left said, “Out with the girls. Be home later.” It was not unusual for her to go out with her girlfriends, but she had always came home by midnight. But at 4 am he rolled over and she wasn’t there. This morning, he had woken up and she still was not there.

On further review her bedroom drawer was cleaned out. No meds or her stuff in the bathroom cabinet. He called her number. It went to voicemail. He texted Mel’s number.

“Sry Mark haven’t seen her since last night. I went out to smoke and she wasn’t there.”

He wondered what was happening.

___________

After a couple drinks with her friends, Lori asked if any of them had ever wanted something different. To just blow everything off and go somewhere.

She went outside to smoke. Standing on the corner she caught the eye of a lorry driver at the stoplight. On a whim she asked:

“Where are you going?”

“Suffolk.”

“Can I get a ride?”

“You got any money?”

As they pulled away Mel came outside to smoke with her.

“Hey Lori what’s this about…” she looked around. “Lori?”

But Lori was gone.

Easily Confused Words: Curb vs. Curve

Curb and curve are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Curb (“kuhrb;” rhymes with blurb) has multiple meanings.

  • As a noun, it means the cement or concrete borders, usually gray or beige colored, along the sides of a street. The curb separates the street from the unpaved ground, lawns, sidewalks, etc.
  • As a verb, it means to cut back or refrain from an activity.

For example:

  • In the phrase “curb your cravings,” someone is suggesting more healthful food alternatives than gorging on sugary or salty snack foods that cause weight gain.
  • In the catchphrase “curb your enthusiasm,” it means don’t expect too much and don’t get to excited. This catchphrase was used for the title of an adult comedy series starring Larry David, that has aired since 2000 on HBO.
  • In the phrase “kick to the curb,” it means to throw out, discard, show or tell someone he or she can leave or quit.

Curve (“kuhrvv;” rhymes with serve, nerve) is a noun. It means a line with one or more arcs to its path as opposed to being straight. Wavy and curly hair is full of curves.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Kirby’s first driver training class was going well until he got a text on his phone. There was a curve in the road ahead. But his eyes were glued to the screen, and he continued to drive straight. The car ran up onto the curb and plowed into a fire hydrant.

Easily Confused Words: Mustard vs. Mustered

Mustard and mustered are easily confused words. They sound the same, but are spelled differently and mean different things.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Mustard (pronounced “muhss-tuhrd”) has multiple meanings.

As a noun:

  • It can mean a wild plant with bright yellow flowers that grows 3-4 feet (1-1.5m) tall in spring.
  • It can mean a dried herb prepared from the wild plant’s flowers and used in food preparation.
  • It can mean a condiment with multiple varieties.
    • Plain mustard is used on hotdogs and hamburgers.
    • Honey mustard is used as a dipping sauce, salad dressing, and as a marinade for chicken wings or other cooked chicken.
    • Spicy mustard is used on bratwursts and pretzels.
    • Dijon mustard, typically made with white wine, and is used on ham and cooked eggs.
  • It can mean a paint, dye, or pigment in a yellow hue or tint.
  • It can mean clothes or other products colored yellow.

Mustered (“muhss-tuhrd”) is the past tense of the verb “muster.” To muster means:

  • to assemble troops or crew for a mission, for review or inspection.
  • to collect or gather something abstract, like one’s courage or gumption.
  • to report for duty or confirm one has showed up for work, as part of a muster roll.

The past tense indicates any one of the scenarios above happened in the past.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Chef Mustafa mustered the courage to tell his boss they were out of dijon mustard. The trade embargo with France had cut off supplies, so they would have to use locally made spicy brown or honey mustard instead. His boss was not pleased. He fumed. He shocked the family sitting around the table. He said the Easter ham dinner was ruined, but there was no way he would lobby to end the embargo over a condiment. It would look weak and petty.

The chefs staff started scrambling to make a mustard that had a similar tangy flavor to Dijon. Using lemon juice, vinegar, and garlic, they found an adequate substitute. They would call it Dija sauce, in honor of the sous chef Khadija.

Easily Confused Words: Cay vs. Key

Cay and key are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Cay (pronounced US: “key”) is a noun. It is a geographic term for a low lying island, sandbar, or rock sticking out of the water. It comes from the indigenous language, Taíno. It was incorporated into Spanish as “Cayo” (“keye-oh”.)

  • Check out a list of other Taíno words that were incorporated into Spanish and English here.
  • There is a Taíno museum in Haiti and one in Puerto Rico. Click the links to learn more.

Key (pronounced “key”) has multiple meanings.

  • It can mean an etched piece of metal used for opening a metal lock on a door, safe, jewelry box, etc.
  • It can mean any tool used to open a door. In 21 century hotels, a plastic card is often the room key. The card has an internal credential to open the room’s door for a limited time and it will stop working after that time has passed. The cards are cheap to produce and if someone forgets to return it to the front desk, it’s not problematic to recreate like a metal key, when you don’t have to original handy.
  • It can mean a carved piece of metal or plastic used in jewelry, home decor, or toys meant to imitate the design of a key that opens doors.
  • In music:
    • it can mean the tactile parts of an instrument that are pressed while playing it to affect the sound produced. Not all instruments have keys, but some that do include pianos, organs, claviers/harpsichords, melodicas, synthesizers, and electric keyboards.
    • it can mean the starting note a song or melody is written from. Check out this video for determining the key of a song by ear.
  • In a figurative sense:
    • It means a solution, a remedy, or a fix for a problem.
    • It means a guaranteed path for a blessed afterlife, as in the phrase “Keys to the Kingdom” in Christian faiths.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Little Wendy was looking at a map. “Why would they call an island a key if it’s not shaped like a key?”

Her dad told her,”It was adopted from words in other languages. Cayo is Spanish which was adopted from an Taíno word meaning low lying island. Key West is adapted from Cayo Hueso, or Bone Island.”

“Oh.”

“See? in other parts of the Caribbean, there’s a Chub Cay, Whale Cay, Rum Cay, South Cat Cay. None of those are shaped like a key either. It’s a word that entered our language from other languages that coincidentally sounded like a word we already had.”

Thank you for reading. Did I forget anything? Please let me know in the comments.

Easily Confused Words: Lady’s vs. Ladies vs. Ladies’

Lady’s, ladies, and ladies’ are easily confused words. All these words sound basically the same, but the trouble comes when they are written down or typed out:

  • Do you need an apostrophe?
  • If you do need an apostrophe, is it before or after the S?

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Lady’s (lay-deez) has multiple meanings.

As a possessive (note the apostrophe is before the s)

  • It is used to indicate ownership of something by one individual female person.
  • It is used to indicate ownership by a person named Lady.
  • It is used to indicate ownership by a creature, like a pet dog or cat, named “Lady.” For example: Lady’s collar was in the driveway. I think she’s run away again. Thankfully she is chipped.

As a contraction, it is a shortened form of “lady is” or “lady has.” Here the apostrophe is indicating letters have been left out. An example of this usage would be found in dialogue by store staff, restaurant floor staff, or poll workers, and referring to a woman in third person.

For example:

  • Possessive: This lady’s receipt is torn in half. Will we still accept it for a refund or should I give her a store credit?
  • Contraction: This lady’s been waiting to check out for five minutes. Would you ring her up?
  • Possessive: I found that lady’s purse in the bathroom/washroom/loo. Someone needs to call her to come pick it up.
  • Contraction: That lady’s saying we forgot her fries.

Ladies (lay-deez) is the plural form of lady. It is used to refer to a group of women, or address a group of women directly.

For example:

  • at the beginning of a live show, the emcee says “Ladies and gentlemen…” to let the audience know to get ready for the show about to start, please sit down and stop talking. If the audience were made up of all women, the emcee would say “Ladies..”

Ladies’ (lay-deez) this is the plural possessive form, note the apostrophe is after the “s.” It is used to refer to something belonging to, or designed for, a group of women.

For example, the Ladies’ restroom/washroom/loo, or the Ladies’ wear portion of a department store.

The following story uses these words correctly:

A server at the cafe asked “Ladies! We found what looks like a lady’s jacket and we thought it might belong to one of you.”

One woman piped up and said, “I don’t think so. It is fuchsia and none of us were wearing that today.”

“All right, well thank you for joining us today. I’ll put it back by the register.”

Just then a man dashed in and asked, “Excuse me, is that a pink jacket?”

“Yes it is,” the server responded.

“Is it a ladies’ size 6?”

The server looked at the tag: “It looks like it is.”

“My daughter left it here. She was preoccupied with her phone and forgot it. We were almost in the theater ticket window when she realized she didn’t have it. I don’t want to have to buy another jacket on the fly in the ladies’ department today. She won’t like any of them. We have a movie to get to and it starts in–10 minutes!”

The server smiled awkwardly as she handed him the jacket.

The man responded, “Oh right. Why am I telling you all this? Thank you for the jacket. I have to go.”

“Bye. Glad we could help.” The server chuckled and waved.

Easily Confused Words: Lettice vs. Lettuce

Lettice and lettuce are easily confused words.

Lettice (pronounced “luh-teece;” rhymes with Bernice and Maurice) is an English version of the female Latin name Letitia (pronounced “luh-tee-shuh;” also spelled Laetitia/Letticia) Laetitia is the Roman goddess of joy and celebrations.

Famous Lettices:

  • Lettice Bryan, American writer of Kentucky Housewife: Containing Nearly Thirteen Hundred Full Receipts, an 1839 cookbook.
    • A funny thing in the US is that old recipe books are sometimes called “receipt books,” and this one is no exception. In more recent times, these words diverged: a receipt is a paper proof a purchase was made, and a recipe is strictly for food preparation. In slang, when someone says I’ve brought/got receipts, they mean they have evidence or proof for their claims.]
  • Lettice Knollys, Countess of Essex during the reign of Elizabeth I.
  • A list of other famous Lettices appears here.

Lettuce (pronounced “let-uss”) is a noun. It is a species of leafy vegetable related to the daisy plant. It grows close to the ground, forming a head from many layers of leaves. Most US lettuce is grown in central California in the Salinas Valley. Click the link to watch a short video about how lettuce is grown, cut, and prepared for market.

Varieties include:

  • Iceberg, a light green variety, its leaves have curly, serrated edges. It grows on round heads. It might be the most well-known lettuce in the US. It is served on hamburgers, sandwiches, and in salads. Click the link to see a picture and learn more about the plant.
  • Romaine: is medium green leaves grow on an oval-shaped head. It has a slight bitter taste. Romaine is used for Caesar salads, wraps, sandwiches, much like iceberg. Click the link to see a picture and learn more about the plant.
  • Endive: This plant is related to chicory. It is pale yellowish green and grows on small, elongated head. Its taste is very bitter. Click the link to see a picture and learn more about the plant.
  • Bibb aka Butter: This variety grows on small heads, but its color is a medium green with rounded edges. Click the link to see a picture and learn more about the plant.
  • Summer Crisp/Batavia/French crisp: This grows on a short, very curly head. Its leaves are medium green. It is sweet, not bitter like Romaine. Click the link to see a picture and learn more about the plant.
  • Leaf: This looks like Romaine but is a lighter green, it grows on a fluffier, elongated head. Click the link to see a picture and learn more about the plant.

If you eat a mixed greens salad or side dish, it may also include:

  • Dandelion: These are the leaves from organically grown dandelion flowers. Dandelion is a wildflower. The leaves are an elongated oval with points along the edges. Click the link to see a picture and learn more about the plant.
  • Arugula: A medium green plant with long oval-shaped leaves with cup shaped holes along the edges. Click the link to see a picture and learn more about the plant.
  • Kale: A dark green plant with very curly edged leaves. Kale has been popular for smoothies in recent years. Click the link to see a picture and learn more about the plant.
  • Swiss chard: This plant grows with leaves extending from a central stalk. The stalks of these are deep fuchsia pink, and the leaves are a deep green.
  • Click the link to see a picture and learn more about the plant.
  • Collards: This plant grows with leaves extending from a central stalk.The stalks of these are white, and the leaves are a very deep green, like an evergreen tree. Collards are very tough and bitter, and are best eaten after cooked on a stovetop. They are very popular in US Southern cuisine, sometimes flavored with ham or meat juices. Click the link to see a picture and learn more about the plant.
  • Mustard Greens: These are the leaves from a mustard plant. They have a slight peppery taste to them. Click the link to see a picture and learn more about the plant.
  • Turnip Greens: These are the leaves from the top of a turnip vegetable, which grows underground. They have curvy, serrated edges. Click the link to see a picture and learn more about the plant.
  • Brussel sprouts: These look like small cabbages growing on a tall stalk. They can be eaten whole by steaming, but sometimes they are peeled into individual leaves for a salad. Click the link to see a picture and learn more about the plant.

If you live in the US and are interesting in growing your own food, your state likely has a website for its agriculture and gardening division. This division is a great resource about soil, soil condition, plant diseases, weather, pests, and other issues related to growing plants where you live.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Lettice didn’t know what she was going to do to keep rabbits out of her vegetable patch. They had gnawed all her lettuce heads to bits. All her carrots were uprooted. It was a disaster.

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED APRIL 8, 2021.

Easily Confused Words: Daffodil vs. Daphne

Daffodil and Daphne are easily confused words. They both feature “fuh” sounds, but are spelled differently.

Daffodil (pronounced “daff-uh-dihll”) is a noun. It means a flowering plant that grows from a bulb in early spring. Daffodils are in the Narcissus genus. This genus has 14,000 varieties.

  • Daffodils are a bright, richly saturated yellow. They have a cylindrical trumpet (aka corona) with a curly edge, surrounded by 6 flat petals. Its leaves are thick, flat blades. Cultivation has led to more color varieties in the trumpet (corona), the petals, or both. These colors include deep orange, pale peach, apricot, coral, white, creamy white, and pink. Cultivation has also created flowers with multiple layers of petals and/or trumpet, slender and spikier petals, much larger trumpets, etc.
  • Jonquils (“zyawn-kwihlz”), also in this genus, have multiple flowerheads to a stalk, rounded petals, and a noticeable fragrance. Its leaves and stalk are tubular, instead of flat blades. They tend to grow in warmer climates.
  • Narcissus tazetta papyraceous has a shorter, wider trumpet (corona.) They are also called paperwhites.
  • On social media and in gardening catalogs, the words daffodil, jonquil and narcissus are often used interchangeably.

In culture:

  • The daffodil is the flower of Wales, a country on the western coast of the British Isles. The country’s saint is St. David, and his day is March 1. So if you see a lot of daffodils and red dragons that day, this is why.
  • Narcissus grows near water. Its name comes from a Greek god who was fascinated by his own reflection. This is the same word that narcissism, in psychology, comes from.
  • In Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie, Amanda Wingfield, an abandoned mother, fondly remembers receiving bouquets of jonquils and having 17 boys visiting her as a teenager.

Daphne (pronounced “daff-nee”) is a female first name from Greek meaning “laurel tree” or “bay tree.”

  • In Greek mythology, it is the name of a nymph pursued by the god Phoebus (Apollo.) Daphne didn’t want to accept Apollo’s affections. So she asks Peneus, the river god and her father, to transform her into something else: a laurel tree. Apollo fashioned a wreath from the tree’s branches to honor her.
    • Laurel wreaths, or objects meant to imitate them, have been used to award performance in sports, the military, and the arts in the West for ages since.
    • Apollo’s pursuit and Daphne’s transformation has been portrayed in paintings and sculptures.

In pop culture:

  • It was the first name of a redheaded, stylish teenager in the Clue Crew on Scooby Doo, a US cartoon of the late 1960s.
  • It was the first name of a physical therapist on the US sitcom Frasier, a spin-off of Cheers.
  • It is the first name of a character on the Netflix series Bridgerton.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Darius knew his Aunt Daphne had been sad since her husband, Uncle Thad, died suddenly. It had been a month ago now. He brought her a bouquet of daffodils because he remembered they were her favorite, and his mother said she wouldn’t miss a handful of her garden flowers. Aunt Daphne was delighted to have company. She made some hot tea and brought out some brownies.

“Thad and I never got to go to the Grand Canyon.”

“Well we should do that. I think he’d want you to be happy, Aunt Daph.”

Easily Confused Words: Paws vs. Pause

Paws and pause are easily confused words. They are also homophones, meaning words that sound the same, but are spelled differently and mean different things. Homophones are a type of homonym, learn more here.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Paws (pronounced “pawz;” rhymes with laws, caws) has multiple meanings.

  • It is the plural form of the noun “paw.” A paw is the multi-toed foot of a furry, multi-legged mammal, like a dog, cat, lion, wolf, otter, weasel, etc. Most animals have more than one leg, so the feet on these legs are collectively called “paws.”
  • As a verb, it is the “it” form: I paw, you paw, he/she/it paws, we paw, they paw. To paw at something is a sweeping or waving touch. For example, a cat that refuses to be ignored during its owner’s videochat meeting will paw at his/her hands or face. They want to be petted or played with, now.
  • In slang:
    • if someone tells someone else “get his/her paws off” something, it means the other person or people shouldn’t touch that thing. People obviously don’t have paws, so there’s an insinuation they are clumsy, have unwashed hands, he/she can’t take care with a given thing.
    • if someone says “wait til I get my paws on ___,” he/she is upset and going to have an intense confrontation with that person.

Pause (pronounced “pawz;” rhymes with cause) has multiple meanings.

As a noun:

  • It can mean observing a period of silence when reading something aloud, reciting something, or giving a speech.
  • It can mean a period of reflection or reconsideration, as in the phrase, “his insensitive tweets gave me pause and I ended up offering the job to my second choice candidate. That person has performed splendidly.”
  • On a recording or playing device (tape recorder, CD player, vinyl player) it is a button that stops recording or playing. Pause is represented by two hash marks: “
  • On a modern dishwasher or clothes washer, the start button often includes a pause feature. The button has a start/pause ⏯ (right pointing arrow & two hashmarks) symbols on the button. If a user forgot to load an item, they can hit this start/pause button. The washing stops, in some cases the door unlocks. The user can add the new item, close the door, and resume the washing by pressing the start/pause button again.
  • With a voice assistant like Siri or Alexa, a user can tell it to pause reading aloud or music.

As a verb:

  • it means stopping or hesitating during speaking or other activity.
  • it can mean to hit a button to freeze video or audio footage. For example, if video or audio is being presented at a court hearing or in government proceedings, the video may be paused at points where an attorney, a government representative or Senator wants to comment on what’s being presented and why it may/may not be problematic.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Pauline couldn’t figure out what happened to her presentation, it was frozen. It turned out the cat’s paws had hit the keyboard, causing it to pause the screen.

Easily Confused Words: Bandy vs. Brandy

Bandy and brandy are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Bandy (pronounced “ban-dee”) has multiple meanings.

  • As a verb, it means to exchange, swap, throw around, or circulate. This can be literal objects or something more abstract, like words or ideas.
  • As an adjective, it describes something with an awkward bend or contortion to it, like a leg deformity.
  • As a noun, it can mean an old-fashioned winter sport that resembles modern ice hockey. It uses a ball instead of a puck. Traditionally played in Northern European countries, England, and Russia, today the World Bandy Federation has members on five of the world’s seven continents.

Brandy (pronounced “bran-dee”) has multiple meanings.

As a noun:

  • It is a female first name from the Dutch language meaning “burnt wine.” It can also be spelled Brandi, Brandee, Brandie, Brandey
    • In pop culture:
      • Brandi Carlile, a US country singer & songwriter. See other famous people with this name here and historic figures here.
      • Brandy You’re A Fine Girl” was a US 1970s pop song by Looking Glass
  • It can also be a surname.
  • In alcoholic beverages, it means a liquor created from wine or fermented fruit juice.
    • A Brandy Alexander cocktail features brandy mixed with creme de cacao and cream

As a verb:

  • it means to preserve food in brandy, like brandied cherries
  • it means to use brandy in the preparation of cooked foods, like a side dish of brandied carrots.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Brandi was invited to play bandy on the lake rink with the neighborhood kids, but she declined. Instead, she wanted to go to the swap meet to sell apple and pear brandy and Christmas cookies she’d made with her Dad.