Easily Confused Words: Convict vs. Convince

Convict and convince are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Convict (pronounced “kuhn-VIHKT”) is a verb. It means to formally charge an accused person with breaking law or laws, and issuing an appropriate sentence or punishment.

Since we’re on the topic, a related noun is convict (pronounced “KAWN-vihkt”.) This means a person who has been convicted and is currently serving a sentence in jail. Examples in pop culture include Jean Valjean, the lead character in Les Miserables, a book by Victor Hugo that has been made into movies and a popular stage musical. Another pop culture example is Dr. Shepard, the lead in The Fugitive.

Notice the verb convict accentuates the second syllable, while the noun accentuates the first syllable.

Convince (pronounced “kuhn-vihnss”) is a verb. It means to talk someone else into your point of view on an issue, or to buy your product or service.
The following story uses both words correctly:

Connor wasn’t sure he would effectively convince the jury that the accused killer, Hollywood hearthrob Craig Childress, should be convicted for killing his partner. But he was trying as hard as he did with any other case. The law doesn’t care about looks, social status, or career success. If you committed murder, you deserve punishment for that crime.

Easily Confused Words: Skein vs. Skin

Skein and skin are easily confused words. The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Skein (pronounced “skayn;” rhymes with rein, pain, feign) is a noun. It means a wound spool of thread or yarn.

Skin (pronounced “sk-yihn;” rhymes with thin, win, bin) has multiple meanings.

As a noun:

  • It can mean the largest organ in the human body, its exterior fleshy covering.
  • It can mean a layer of this fleshy covering. After a bad sunburn, skin blisters then peels its top layer.
  • It can mean the exterior covering of an animal.
    it can mean the peel of a fruit or vegetable that is often removed before eating.

As a verb, it means to remove the skin of a dead animal, drying and stretching it to make clothing or housing.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Skylar said she wanted a leopard skin coat like movie stars wore in the Hollywood’s Golden Age. This wish didn’t gel with her family’s vegan beliefs. Her sister Skipper made the next best thing. First she used skeins of golden beige and black cashmere woven together like leopard fur print. Then these were cut and sewn to wool tailored panels. It took a lot of work and sneaking around to make the coat without Skylar learning about it.

Ornaments 2016 Procedure

This post is appearing on wildcard Friday at the blog. It’s not Easily Confused Words, which are posted Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. All these crafting procedures are appearing throughout the day on Friday, December 27, 2019. If you aren’t interested in this post, feel free to delete this email.

As you know by now, I am part of a Christmas ornament swap. In 2016, I took the ribbon pinecone egg idea and used it on styrofoam balls (spheres.)

Here are the materials I used for this project:

  • Styrofoam balls, 3″ around
  • Lace ribbon, 5/8″ wide
  • Striped ribbon, cream with red stripe, 3/8″ wide
  • Grosgrain ribbon in solid holiday colors: red, kelly green, royal blue, 5/8″ wide
  • Nylon (semi-transparent) ribbon, 1/8″ wide for hanging strings
  • A box of stick pins with circular stud heads on them, 50-100
  • School glue, large bottle
  • Fabric scissors

Here is a slideshow of the process:

THE BASIC PROCESS: With each ball, there are small cut rectangles of ribbon (1″) that are folded down on two top corners and these are glued in place. Then along the bottom of this same piece of ribbon, glue is run along the bottom side that the folded corners are pointing to. Then, taking two stick pins in the lower two corners, you stick the folded ribbon into the ball. Then you repeat the process, slightly overlapping the panels so you can’t see the styrofoam underneath. As you finish a row, start a new one by positioning the first folded ribbon piece on top of a ribbon piece intersection of the previous row. [Think fish scales or sequins, they’re staggered so there is overlap horizontally and vertically for total coverage.] Then place the second folded piece slightly overlapping the first; it too should have a point that overlaps the intersection in the row above it. Rinse and repeat until this row is finished.

The basics being established, this is how I did it:

  1. At the top of the ball, I glued two overlapping 2-3″ strip of ribbon. The I glued two strips of lace on top of those. I repeated this for the very bottom of the ball as well. I did this because the lace has holes in it (aka “openwork”) that would show styrofoam ball. I didn’t want any styrofoam visible at all, so the ribbon underlayer on the top and bottom of the ball was important.
  2. Then I framed the top “pole” of the sphere with four folded pieces of ribbon all pointing into the center. PRO TIP: If for any reason you put a pin in the wrong place, you can use the head of the pin to tug it back out. You don’t want to have to use pliers to get the pin out because it could puncture or dent the styrofoam ball, and it would look lopsided. NOTE: With all the pushing and pulling of these pins, you can expect your fingertips to get a little numb/sore during this project.
  3. The next folded ribbons were placed over the intersections of the previous row. Then folded ribbons are placed between these. I admit this row is a little unusual since it is filled in at the corners, then filled in the gaps. No other row works like this.
  4. Well at this point, row 3, you have a complete ring of ribbon to work with. Place the folded ribbon at the intersection of the folded ribbons of a previous row. Apply glue and pin it in place. Repeat until you reach the end of the ball and cannot make any more rows. Cut a 3″ piece of ribbon, tuck the ends under, and glue and pin it in place to cover the bald spot. Repeat for 13 balls.
  5. Using 1/8″ wide ribbon, cut 6″ pieces and tie a knot in the end. Take a straight pin and pin the hanging cord into the very top of the ball.

LESSONS LEARNED: Originally I thought that all the balls would be lace. I guess I like farmhouse/primitive/homespun Christmas decor. Unfortunately, I got two balls done with three rolls of ribbon. Lace and ribbon isn’t cheap, and rolls are anywhere from 3-10 yards per spool. I ran into the same issue with the striped ribbon. The solid grosgrain ribbon came in thicker rolls, and this ribbon is more tolerant of glue than satin ribbons (meaning it doesn’t look like stained by glue.) If I had these balls to do all over again, I would only use the grosgrain.

If you liked this post, you may enjoy the following related ones:

Ornaments 2019

Ornaments 2018

Ornaments 2016

Ornaments 2014

Ornaments 2013

2017 and other previous years posts are in development.

Ornaments 2015 Procedure

This post is appearing on wildcard Friday at the blog. It’s not Easily Confused Words, which are posted Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. All these crafting procedures are appearing throughout the day on Friday, December 27, 2019. If you aren’t interested in this post, feel free to delete this email.

I make ornaments as part of a swap. In 2015, I made Christmas carol decorated bulbs.

Materials for these ornaments:

  • Flattened oval acrylic ornaments (like an M & M original candy), 13
  • Blue metallic spray paint (Rustoleum/Krylon)
  • Gray primer spray paint (Rustoleum/Krylon)
  • Silver permanent marker
  • A paper bag (for a spraying “studio”)
  • Face mask
  • Glitter glue in different colors–gold, red, green, silver
  • Goggles
  • Soft scrub or other creamy wet paste cleaner
  • Paper towels
  • Nitrile gloves
  • Newspaper, cheap shower curtain, or other “dropcloth” for tabletop drying
  • Gift boxes from a dollar store, 13

Here is a slideshow of the ornament process:

At first I wanted to do chalkboard ornaments with white Christmas carol lyric samples on them. But I couldn’t find sprayable chalkboard paint during the holidays of 2015 where I lived, nor could I find chalkboard colored bulbs at the time.

  1. I asked everyone in the swap what their favorite Christmas carols were. I had moderate success getting timely responses on social media and via text messages. I made a list of the songs and picked a sample line for each bulb.
  2. I removed the tops of the bulbs.
  3. The next step was spraying primer. I wore a mask, goggles, and nitrile gloves. I took each bulb in the paper bag studio into the woods behind my house. I sprayed the bulbs with primer on one side at a time. I used the stopwatch feature on my phone to let me know when the primer should be dry on each side before touching it. Once both sides were dry, I picked up the bulb on my gloved finger holding the bulb in the upper part of the bag, I sprayed the sides of the bulb for full primer coverage. I repeated this 13 times.
  4. Using the bag and protective gear, I used the same technique as #3 to apply the spray paint to the bulbs. I sprayed the bulbs with paint one at a time, one side at a time. Once both sides were dry, I picked up the bulb on my gloved finger holding the bulb in the upper part of the bag, I sprayed the sides of the bulb for full spray paint coverage. I waited for a couple minutes for it to dry. I repeated this 13 times.
  5. Using graphic design freeware, I mapped out how I wanted the bulbs to look, and what typefaces I might imitate with each sample lyric.
  6. Once I had the marker and the dry bulbs, I started writing lyrics in silver marker on the bulbs. Sometimes I ran out of space, I had to get a wet paper towel with creamy scrub cleaner on it to wipe the mistake lettering off to start over. I admit this happened quite a bit for wordier songs. I set the lettered bulb aside and let it dry. Then I repeated this step 13 times.
  7. I used glitter glue to dot the “i’s” for some bulbs. Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer meant red glitter glue in certain places. Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas had a gold glitter star on it.
  8. I wrote “2015” on the bottom of the bulbs with the silver marker and allowed them to dry.
  9. I replaced the caps to the bulbs.
  10. I boxed these up in gift boxes from a dollar store.

LESSONS LEARNED: The hardest part of these ornaments was getting people in the swap to tell me their favorite Christmas song. Most said they said they didn’t have one. So making personalized ornaments, where I have to fish/inquire about information, is something I will likely not do again. If you are on a deadline, needing survey info can be a big hold up, that’s all I’m trying to say here.

Songs I referenced:

  • Christmas Time Is Here (the Charlie Brown Christmas song)
  • Walking In A Winter Wonderland
  • Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree
  • Do You Hear What I Hear?
  • Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer
  • The Little Drummer Boy
  • Joy to the World
  • Carol of the Bells
  • O Holy Night
  • O Little Town of Bethlehem
  • Silent Night

If you liked this post, you may enjoy the following related ones:

2017 and other previous years posts are in development.

Ornaments 2014 Procedure

This post is appearing on wildcard Friday at the blog. It’s not Easily Confused Words, which are posted Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. All these crafting procedures are appearing throughout the day on Friday, December 27, 2019. If you aren’t interested in this post, feel free to delete this email.

I am part of an ornament swap. In 2014, I made wreath ornaments. These are probably some of the easiest ornaments I’ve ever made.

Here are the materials needed:

  • Miniature grapevine (or other dried natural) wreaths, 13
  • Grosgrain or thick ribbon in a holiday color—red, green, white, etc., or a patterned.
  • Hanging string: Raffia, burlap, yarn
  • Small tipped paintbrush
  • Marker
  • Hot glue gun
  • A metal fork for making tiny bows
  • Hot glue sticks
  1. I removed the tags from the wreaths with scissors.
  2. I wrapped a wreath in ribbon by looping it around the inside at an angle. I kept wrapping until I reached the starting point. Making sure the ribbon overlapped itself, I cut the ribbon.
  3. I used this first ribbon as a guide to cut 13 more similarly sized pieces.
  4. I warmed up the hot glue gun and attached the wrapping ribbon pieces to the wreaths. Glue is only needed for the starting end and then for overlapping the other end onto the starting end. The rest of the ribbon is held by tension.
  5. I cut 3″ pieces of rafia. I looped them through each wreath and tied a knot in the ends. An alternative for this is to get ribbon you can paint the year on, or get ribbon with the year printed on it.
  6. I cut 3/5″ pieces of ribbon and using a dinner fork held in place, I tied a tiny bow and slid it off the fork’s prongs. You can use anything narrow with two tines or prongs, as long as one side is open ended for sliding the finished bow off once it’s been tied. Since these wreaths are pretty small, using fingers to help with the bows won’t work, the bow will be too big, not proportionate to the wreath’s size.
  7. I used the hot glue gun to attach the tiny bows to wreath. If it can cover where the wrapping ribbon is overlapped, this is preferable. If that’s not possible, just put the bow on the opposite facing side of the overlap point. When the ornament is hanging on the tree, the overlap point will be facing inside the tree and won’t be visible.

If you liked this post, you may enjoy the following related ones:

Ornaments 2019

Ornaments 2018

Ornaments 2016

Ornaments 2015

Ornaments 2013

2017 and other previous years posts are in development.

Ornaments 2013 Procedure

This post is appearing on wildcard Friday at the blog. It’s not Easily Confused Words, which are posted Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. All these crafting procedures are appearing throughout the day on Friday, December 27, 2019. If you aren’t interested in this post, feel free to delete this email.

I am part of an ornaments swap. In 2013, I made “coastal Christmas” themed ornaments. They are acrylic globes with a miniature beach inside them.

Here are the materials I used for this project:

  • Flip flop buttons in a variety of colors and patterns (3 to a bag), 5 bags (unless you want some ornaments to use sunglasses dangling in the middle)
  • Seashell, starfish themed buttons (the buttons at the link look larger than the ones I found years ago, these also have glitter on them that would have to be scratched off if you wanted to paint them a different color)
  • Pastel and bright pink acrylic paint
  • Acrylic bulbs, 13
  • Nylon thread, not too thick
  • Vase filler sand in white (found at a dollar store or Walmart near artificial flowers)
  • Bag of miniature shells (found at the craft store near artificial flowers)
  • Glitter glue in Christmas colors–green, red, blue, silver, gold, OR try to match the colors of the flip flop buttons (blue, lime green, fuchsia, orange)
  • Superglue
  • Scissors or cutting pliers
  • A wood skewer, dowel, or the handle of a craft paintbrush that will fit into a 1/2″ opening
  • Narrow tip funnel
  • Newspaper or tarp to protect the work surface

For wrapping the finished ornaments:

  • Gift buckets, or big cupcake sized gift boxes
  • Tissue paper
  • Name tags
  1. I pinched the metal tops off all the acrylic bulbs and set them aside.
  2. I cut the backs off all the flip flop buttons. Because these are plastic buttons they have a little arch on the back where the thread would go to attach it to a piece of clothing. Since I am not using the buttons for this purpose, this little arch had to be removed. This arch can’t be used for dangling from the nylon thread because it will not hang properly.
  3. I glued the flip flops together (one left and one right) with super glue to make a pair of shoes.
  4. I cut 13 pieces of nylon thread, about 3″ long.
  5. I bend the nylon thread in half, then I superglued the bend in the thread to the bottom of each flipflop button pair of shoes. The toes of the shoes pointed downward.
  6. Then I inserted the ends of the nylon thread through the bottom of the holes in the metal top of an ornament. Then I tied a double knot and cut off the excess thread.
  7. On the back of the flip flops, I covered the soles in glitter glue so the hanging string was less visible. Then I set these aside to dry.
  8. Using a funnel inserted into each acrylic bulb, I poured about 1/8 cup of sand into the bottom.
  9. Then I sprinkled the tiny seashells into the globes, trying to get a variety of shapes in each one. I used a skinny paint brush handle to poke them around into place on the sand.
  10. Then I opened the shell and starfish buttons. I cut the backs off them. I painted them with acrylic craft paint in colors like pale blue, pale yellow, bright prink, bright orange. Once these dried, I dropped them into the globes as well. I used a skinny paint brush handle to poke them around into place on the sand.
  11. Then I carefully lowered tops (with the flip flop sandals glued to them) into each globe. Usually to get a metal top back onto a globe you have to pinch the hanging wire prongs slightly so they will slide back inside the globe properly.
  12. I took pictures of the final globes.
  13. I cut a slit in each bucket lid and put the ornament hanging ring in it so the ornament wouldn’t move around. I wrapped them in tissue paper and put them in a small bucket for the swap.

LESSONS LEARNED: I originally wanted to use sandbox sand, but it was far too heavy for a Christmas bulb to hang properly on a tree. That’s when I found vase sand at the dollar store. It looks like the real thing but weighs far less in small quantities.

NOTES: I have seen flip flop buttons at Hobby Lobby that are a little larger than those I used, but would still probably work in some fashion.

If you liked this post, you may enjoy the following related ones:

Ornaments 2019

Ornaments 2018

Ornaments 2016

Ornaments 2015

Ornaments 2014

2017 and other previous years posts are in development.

Ornaments 2019 Procedure

This post is appearing on wildcard Friday at the blog. It’s not Easily Confused Words, which are posted Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. All these crafting procedures are appearing throughout the day on Friday, December 27, 2019. If you aren’t interested in this post, feel free to delete this email.

If you remember my post from last year, you know I make ornaments as part of a swap. I have done this for almost ten years.

After much consideration, I decided this year’s ornaments would look like flat Christmas bulbs. They would be made with small wood embroidery hoops and lots of white, green, red, and patterned ribbon in widths of 5/8″and 3/8.”

The materials for this project are:

  • 16 embroidery hoops, preferably wood
  • 20 rolls of ribbon
  • Fabric scissors
  • G2 superglue by Loctite (dries in 30 minutes)
  • Spring-loaded clothespins that clasp (not the historic flat or round wood type)
  • Two small books of 5″ x 5″ holiday patterned cardstock
  • Pencil
  • A box of 18 christmas cards (for wrapping and presentation)
  • Clear tape
  • Ruler
  • Craft razor (Exacto) knife
  • Small, rubberized cutting mat

I found a holiday themed multipack of ribbon in varying widths. It had about 15 rolls in the box. One roll was 1/8″ wide and I would use it for ornament hanging cord later in the process. Another roll had a pattern that was more vertical and would look sideways, so I set it aside as well. I would use it for hanging cord on the red ornaments.

Here is a slideshow of the materials and process, followed by the steps:

  1. With each hoop, I loosened the screw on the top. This loosened the tension, and enabled me to removed the smaller inner hoop. This smaller hoop is the one that would have strips of ribbon glued onto its sides.
  2. I traced an outline of the large and small hoops onto individual pieces of holiday-themed card stock. I sought out cardstock patterns that were red and green background, or had some red and green to their patterns. I cut 16 circles out of the cardstock in each size. The larger circles would be backing, the smaller circles would be tucked behind the ribbon strips for additional smoothness and stiffness. Once they were all cut out, the circles were set aside until steps 8 & 9.
  3. I measured, then cut strips of ribbon for each hoop as I went. The longest piece of ribbon was glued across the widest part of the hoop, held in place, and allowed to dry. Originally I used superglue (the noxious smelling kind that dries in seconds) and held it in place with my fingers. Once I ran out of this glue, I switched to a slower drying glue that came in a larger bottle. I used clothespins to hold the ribbon in place for this slower drying glue. PRO TIP: Saving time is great when I have a lot to do. But it’s also important to be kind to my hands in colder seasons. If you craft a lot, spare your hands, and use G2 (or similar) glue. To hold pieces in place as they dry for 1/2 hour, use clothespins to clamp them in place. Sometimes the clothespins stick a little, but some gentle tugs back and forth release them.
  4. Once this center ribbon strip was dry, two strips of another color or pattern were placed above it and below it. These pieces slightly overlapped the first piece of ribbon. The second ribbons were glued and clamped for drying. Then a third layer of ribbon was glued in place. This step was repeated above and below until the top edges were covered with ribbon.
  5. It was important that each hoop had a slightly different patterning. As I went, some ribbon spools ran out so when a spool got low I used the whole thing up or just phased it out if there wasn’t enough. The smaller strips near the top and bottom of a hoop were a good use of ribbon that was running out.
  6. Once all the smaller hoops were covered in ribbon on one side and dry, they were placed back in their larger hoop frames.
  7. I pushed the inner hoop slightly forward, then tightened the top screw of the hoop. Then flipping the hoop over, I trimmed off excess ribbon hanging off the back.
  8. I tucked the smaller cardstock in behind the ribbon of the smaller hoop. Red ornaments got red paper, green ornaments got green paper, white ornaments got white paper.
  9. The larger circles of holiday cardstock were glued to the back edge of each ornament and left to dry. A mostly green ornament got a green back, a mostly red ornament got a red back, etc.
  10. Finding 16 gift boxes to fit the hoop ornaments without spending more money than the ornaments had cost was a problem. But I did find a bin of last year’s Christmas cards on sale, 18 in a box for under $10. And they had ornaments in their design. What a convenient coincidence! By holding a large hoop up the card, I could tell it was big enough to make a box out of.
  11. The front of the card would be the lid, and the back of the card would be the base. I drew pencil lines on the inside of the card for a 5″ bottom box with 1/4″ high sides. I cut the lines at the corners of the box’s sides so a tab piece would overlap onto the other side.
  12. I burnished the pencil lines for the edges of the bottom and top (where it would be folded) with the tip of the scissors (a butter knife or burnisher also works) on a small cutting mat. I repeated this step 16 times.
  13. Then I placed each ornament in a box.
  14. A 6″ piece of ribbon was cut for the hanging cord of each ornament. It was looped through underneath the top screw, then tied the ends in a knot. These cords matched the colors on the ornament as well.
  15. I labeled each box with a recipient.
  16. There is some ribbon left over. Crafting is fun but one issue is, like a big holiday dinner, there are always leftovers. Reusing them instead of discarding them is important. I think that the leftover ribbon may be used for gift bows or pom-poms. ADDITIONAL TIP: I wanted to use all the ribbon that came in the box, but satin ribbon isn’t the most compliant with runny, slow-drying glue. The glue can pool and soak in. Thicker ribbons, like grosgrain and metallics, don’t bleed glue through them. So if you make these, or I make another set, avoid using satin ribbons.

If you liked this post, you may enjoy the following related ones:

2017 and other previous years posts are in development.

Easily Confused Words: Inject vs. Infect

Inject and infect are easily confused words.

Inject (“ihn-jehkt”) is to use a hypodermic needle (or similar device) to insert a liquid substance past a thick surface. For example:

  • Vaccines are injected through the skin and into muscle tissue. The body adapts to the vaccine and uses it fight off flu and other communicable diseases.
  • In cooking, a flavor injector is used to add marinade, broth, or other liquid inside the fibers of the meat.
  • In hydraulic fracturing (aka fracking), a chemical compound is injected into the ground.

Infect (pronounced “ihn-fehkt”) is a verb. It means to share bacteria or a virus that causes illness. Diseases are spread in a number of ways:

  • through the air via particles emitted by coughing and sneezing
  • exchange of bodily fluids
  • insects like fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes
  • unclean surfaces
  • unclean hands

This language has been incorporated in IT to indicate an operating system or software has encountered malicious code designed to make the machine inoperable.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Ignacio didn’t want the shots. Without them, though, the family couldn’t travel to Issa’s home country and see her parents. Issa explained what was going on.
“We need you to do this for us, Iggy. Shots hurt a little when the nurse injects you, but they make your system stronger. You don’t want to be infected with measles. It can be deadly.

“All right, I guess.” Ignacio held out his arm begrudgingly. He still wasn’t happy about the shots, but he did want to see another country.

Easily Confused Words: Legos vs. Lagos

Legos and Lagos are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Legos (pronounced “lay-gOHz”) are a proper noun. They are a series of plastic brick toys made for building all sorts of things. People of all ages enjoy building with legos. Their name comes from words in the Dutch language for “let’s play.”

Lagos (pronounced “lay-gohss”) is a proper noun. It is the name for the former capital of Nigeria.

The following story uses both words correctly:
On a flight to Lagos, a child was screaming and kicking the chair in front of her. Passengers were annoyed, the parents were frustrated and embarrassed, asking her to quiet down to no avail. Luther, a professional sculptor of Legos, had sampler project packs in his carry-on. He pulled out one of a small plane and walked over to where the family was seated. “Here, build something.” The family looked at him in disbelief at first. Then the little girl took it, tore it open, and got to work. Luther returned to his seat, and the plane was noticeably quieter.

This post relates to another post: Easily Confused Words: Logos vs. Lagos.

Easily Confused Words: Chino vs China

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway. 

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Chino (pronounced “chee-noh”) is a noun. It means a ribbed cotton material used to make work or utilitarian clothing. It can also mean clothing pieces, like pants, made from this material.

China (pronounced “cheye-nuh”) has multiple meanings.

  • As a proper noun, it means a country in Asia with a history that goes back centuries. Its flag is red with four yellow stars on the upper left—one large, three are small.
  • As a noun, it means fragile porcelain dishware that families use to eat meals. Often these are a wedding gift for a new couple starting a homestead together. Typically less wealthy families save dining on their china for holidays and special occasions. Formal china may have delicate patterns, and gold or other metal detailing, and that demands careful washing by hand. Metal detailing also means the pieces can’t be putin the microwave.
    Earthenware or other durable materials are better suited for plates, bowls, and mugs used on a daily basis by busy families with a dishwashing machine and no housekeeper.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Before a business trip to China, Charise picked up a couple extra pairs of chinos and a tunic sweater.