Easily Confused Words: Wheel vs. We’ll

Wheel and we’ll are easily confused words. They are also homophones, meaning they are pronounced the same, but are spelled differently.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway.

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Wheel (pronounced “w-eel”)

  • As a noun, it means a round circle used to move people or items over distances, or in manufacturing, to ease the process of making something.
    • Machinery wheels have spokes or other supports built around their inner rim for support so they don’t collapse from weight or other stressors. Wheels can be made of wood, metals, rubber.
    • Cheese is made into “wheels” for salt uptake and mold distribution reasons. Learn more here.
    • The phrase “take the wheel” means literally to drive a car or other vehicle. Figuratively it means to take charge or assume a leadership role because someone else cannot, doesn’t want to, or is in over their head.
  • As a verb, it means to move or come on over to destination point.

We’ll (pronounced “w-eel”) is a contraction of “we will.” It’s a phrase that expresses the intent of two or more people to take action in the future.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Weiland and Wendy were having a beautiful picnic. The sunshine starting disappearing though, and dark clouds were rolling in. “We’ll need to head back before the storm,” said Weiland. “Would you take the wheel? I’m feeling a little tired.”

 

 

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Easily Confused Words: Fazed vs. Phase

Fazed and phase are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway.

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Fazed (pronounced “fayzdh”) is the past tense of the verb faze. To faze means to disturb, to distract, to daunt someone.

Phase (pronounced “fayz”) is a noun.

  • It can mean a period of time noted for certain characteristics, like a person’s, or other creature’s, life. For example, two phases of a butterfly’s life are the caterpillar and the pupae/cocoon.chrysalis.
  • It can mean a portion of a project or process.
  • It can mean an aspect or perspective on an issue.

The following story uses both words correctly:

No one believed any mayor could balance the budget or turn the economy around. Phaidon got elected. He was briefed about the city’s problems. Much to the surprise of his peers, he appeared not fazed at all. He confidently breezed through the next press conference. He appeared energetic and full of ideas. He emphasized that many communities deal with changes, and this was just a redevelopment phase for a brilliant comeback for Phoeniciaport.

 

Easily Confused Words: Avert vs. Overt

Avert and overt are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway.

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Avert (pronounced “uh-vuhrt”) is a verb.

  • It can mean to redirect or turn away from a point of focus. It’s frequently used in a command: “avert your eyes.”
  • It can mean to take actions to stop an event or encounter. For example, around the world, people have different talismans or traditions for averting evil and evil spirits.

Overt (pronounced “oh-vuhrt”) is an adjective. It describes explicit, blatant expressions of a theme or idea. There’s no effort at hiding or concealment, it’s out in the open. And typically these expressions are controversial, disturbing, or provocative, there’s a reason their being hidden was an option in the first place.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Ovidio and Ollie were told to avert their eyes. There were overt and explicit scenes of an R rated movie on TV that Ovidio’s stepdad was watching. Naturally, the two boys peeked, then ran to the treehouse to talk about what they saw.

 

Easily Confused Words: Crush vs. Crash

Crush and crash are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway.

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Crush (pronounced “kruh-sh”; rhymes with flush, mush, lush) has multiple meanings.

  • As a verb, it means to destroy by mashing with one’s hands or feet. Figuratively, it can mean to destroy someone emotionally or professionally. Not with physical violence, but other harmful actions.
  • As a noun, in slang, it means the object of a person’s affections, or having feelings for someone he/she doesn’t know about. Songs that mention this include Gershwin’s 1920’s song “I’ve Got A Crush On You,” Jennifer’s Paige’s 1990s pop song “Just A Little Crush.”
  • As a verb, in slang, it means to feel affections for someone that he/she is often unaware of.

Crash (pronounced “kr-ash”; rhymes with flash, cash, hash) has multiple meanings.

  • As a noun, it can mean a collision, or other run in, between two or more people, machines, entities, etc.
  • As a noun, it can mean a loud sound indicating something’s hit the floor or ground and broken, or a collision has taken place.
  • As a noun, it can mean the sound cymbals make when played in an orchestra.
  • As a noun, in finance, it means a sudden drop in value that typically leads to recession or depression in the marketplace.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Krupa was practicing his saxophone when Kristy crashed into him in the hallway. She said she was sorry, and could she drop by his dorm later to discuss math homework? Sure, he said. Later, Parker came by while he was making dinner.

Krupa was oblivious to his own charms, because both students had a bit of crush on him.

Easily Confused Words: Terrain vs. Terrine

Terrain and terrine are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway.

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Terrain (pronounced “tuh-rain”) is a noun. It means a piece or tract of land being studied for its characteristics. Typically this is for cartography (mapmaking), business, or military purposes. Figuratively, it can mean a social, business, or political scenario.

Terrine (pronounced “tuh-reen”) is a noun.

It can mean a casserole dish made of clay or pottery.

It can mean a baked dish made from meat, seafood and/or vegetables, and served cold. Terrines are prepared and baked in a clay or metal pan. Sometimes the pan is molded in an animal shape, like a fish, for a seafood terrine.

What makes a terrine different from pate? Pate is often made from liver, and is smooth, much more pulverized consistency. A terrine has more chunky, diced components. See this site for more information.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Terrence was looking for a spot in town to have a film and food festival outdoors. Downtown at the waterfront park would be lovely, but the bugs and a muddy, mushy terrain were turn-offs. Utimately, he chose the desert gardens and put up tents.  Since it was not the windy or rainy season, it should be comfortable spot for everyone. To help people stay cool, there were multiple portable AC’s. The participating food vendors agreed they would serve terrines, gelato, quiches, and other cold dishes. Cold beer, cold italian sodas, and chilled wine would be the drink options. This whole thing was really coming together!

Easily Confused Words: Medaling vs. Meddling

Medaling and meddling are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway.

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Medaling (pronounced “meh-duh-lihng”) is the gerund form of the verb “medal.” It means to win or receive a medal (a precious metal hanging on a ribbon) for an achievement. For example, Michael Phelps is famous for medaling in multiple swimming events.

[Medal is also a noun, it is covered in another post. More on that later.]

Meddling (pronounced “med-lihng; rhymes with peddling) is a verb. It means to interfere, to compromise, or to try to change an outcome for one’s own benefit. Usually it can be destructive to the affected parties, and the desired outcome options that were in place before the meddling happened.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Medina was deeply disappointed to have her record questioned after medaling in the decathlon. Rumors swirled that she had been taking performance enhancing drugs.

But that wasn’t the only scandal afoot this season. The official drug testing firm for the GlobalGames, Tickertape, had recently fired employees. They had been accused of mislabeling samples, and meddling with those samples of unfavored competitors in the Games. This marred the reputation of honest competitors, while letting guilty ones get away with cheating.

This post relates to another post: Easily Confused Words: Medal vs. Metal.

Easily Confused Words: Fund vs. Found

Fund and found are easily confused words.

The spell-check application of most word processing software programs would not catch a slip-up of these two words. Spell-check is looking for words that aren’t in its dictionary, and words that resemble words in its dictionary, but are possibly spelled wrong. Spell-check isn’t perfect. It doesn’t know and can’t guess what word you wanted, or what word you meant, it can only judge the words on the page. If you used words that are all spelled correctly, it gives you a pass anyway.

Autocorrect suggests words that start with the same letters. It’s suggesting what word you may want to save time, but quite often, its suggestions are pretty off base. They don’t help you out, but they do make you laugh.

Fund (pronounced “fuhnd”) has multiple meanings.

  • As a verb, it means to finance or offer money for a cause.
  • As a noun, it means an account used to finance a cause.

Found (pronounced “fow-nd”) has multiple meanings.

  • As a verb, it can mean to start a business or organization.
  • As an adjective, it can mean objects that have been located by someone other than the owner. Found pet, a “Lost and Found” bin.

The following story uses both words correctly:

Funske found that raising funds for a local charity was grueling. It was necessary to keep the shelters open, but it was the least enjoyable part of working for a non-profit. Then she found success with an event planner, Fabian Fredericks. He came from a weddings and business gala background. He had a lot of ideas for throwing bashes that were very engaging. People couldn’t wait to go. They were happier to make donations and pitch in to help her cause.